1000th member of Job Club in Pollokshaws

THERE is a new hope for jobseekers in Glasgow.

With continued pressure on services in the city, one church has stepped forward and already helped 1,000 people in their journey towards finding work.
Pollokshaws Methodist Church partnered with award-winning charity Christians Against Poverty four years ago to open a job club with almost a quarter finding work as a result.

CAP Job Club Manager Phil Haggis said: “For a job club to have such a great success rate is very rare, particularly in the current climate of unemployment.
“We know Job Centre Pluses are under enormous pressure across the country, which is why we have partnered with them and see most of our members being referred by them to us.“The beauty of local churches is that they are a great resource in the community and by using the fantastic materials created by Christians Against Poverty we are seeing all our members graduating with a renewed confidence and fervor to put themselves forward forjobs.”

Pollokshaws Job Club’s 1000th member Craig Broadley was recently presented with a framed certificate to mark this historic landmark and members shared a celebration chocolate cake with 1000 candles.
The job club was also recently visited by the Vice-President of the Methodist Conference Jill Baker, who said: “We were very impressed with the work which we saw at Pollokshaws Job Club, which is living out the good news of Jesus in real, practical ways.

“The emphasis on community was of particular importance, treating people as individuals but also as part of society and working towards building the sort of communities where everyone is valued and supported.”
Pollokshaws Job Club is one of 163 job clubs across the UK run in partnership with Christians Against Poverty. To book into the 8-week course visit capuk.org and type in your postcode to find your nearest one.

Christians Against Poverty is determined to reduce hardship in the UK, through the local Church. It does this through 576 poverty fighting services, including 306 Debt Centres, 163 Job Clubs, 71 Release Groups and 36 Life Skills courses, helping people develop basic financial and practical skills.

All the services are given freely regardless of age, gender, faith or background.

  • CAP works to stop interest and charges (successful in 90% of cases)
  • The average person goes debt free with CAP is 21 months
  • In CAP’s 20th year, the charity expects to help 20,000 people
  • The most recent CAP Client Report published in June, found that prior to working with CAP, 78% of clients with children had been unable to feed or clothe them. In addition the report also found that prior to working with CAP 65% of clients skipped meals due to debt and 36% had considered, or attempted, suicide (rising to 40% in Wales).

1000 Members

Creating a culture of welcome: church-led responses to migration and refugees

At the recent JPIT conference, David Bradwell, JPIT member and Co-ordinator of Scottish Faiths Action for Refugees, and Philip Jones and other members of Wilbraham St Ninian’s URC who have direct experience of the UK asylum and refugee system, led a session on the UK’s response to refugees.

They explored practical ways your church can demonstrate love-of-neighbour. This is for everyone, whether or not you have asylum seekers or refugees living in your local area: there are things all of us can do to create a culture of welcome in church and in society.

Read the briefing paper Made for Goodness: A faithful response to the refugee crisis.

If you want to have sacred conversations on migrating within your local church or church related group @home in a strange place is a very useful resource.

Here are some Church organisations carrying out work with refugees that you can get involved with.

Scottish Faiths Action for Refugees

Christian Aid

City of Sanctuary

Churches’ Commission for Migrants in Europe

CTBI Focus on Refugees

Universal Credit is driving families to food banks

A report by the Trussell Trust notes a 51% rise in food bank use in Universal Credit Areas and a 13% rise in other areas. Many areas in Scotland are now full service areas for Universal Credit, meaning that those under pension age claiming income-related benefits for the first time will wait at least a month for their first payment.

 

Copyright for churches – you need to know!

Every piece of original work, whether written, composed or filmed, is protected by copyright during the creator’s lifetime and generally for 70 years after the end of the year in which they died.

Copyright is an intellectual property protection which affects the use of liturgy, music, images and other resources or text in worship, online and in print.

The law on copyright has significant implications for local churches, a number of which have been pursued by copyright holders for alleged copyright infringement with the potential for significant fines and legal costs.

To stay within the law, all churches need copyright approval to:

  • Photocopy hymns
  • Show hymns on an overhead projector
  • Photocopy text from books
  • Record music, such as a church concert
  • Publish others’ work in a church magazine
  • Use others’ images or text on a church website

Read more

Our Calling – the connexion

the connexion is a free magazine about the life and work of the Methodist Church, bringing together inspirational stories from Methodist people who are passionate about sharing God’s love to change lives.

Issue 10 challenges the Church to refocus on its core purpose of Our Calling.
Stories from across the Connexion tell how local churches are prioritising worship, learning and caring, service and evangelism in response to God’s love.

Download a PDF of the connexion issue 10 – Winter 2018 

Learning and Caring – Israel and Palestine

A message of peace for the peoples of Israel and Palestine was given in a special service at Stirling Methodist Church.

The service, led by lay preacher David Rogerson, included Stirling MP Stephen Kerr, local councillors Ross Oxburgh and Alasdair Tollemache and Azam Haider from the Stirling Islamic Centre.

Ruth Cape shared her personal experience of cycling from the UK to Palestine and Israel and, through her Cycle 48 initiative, visited the sites of seven former Palestinian towns and villages where people were working to build peace between the communities through genuine understanding of the wrongs of the past and present.

Azam Haider shared stories from the earliest days of Islam, of respect and mutual support across Jewish, Christian and Muslim traditions.